Tag Archives: Christianity

Next Halloween

Heathen kids who know nothing about Christianity like to dress to shock on Halloween.

Catholic kids need to show them that All Hallows’ Eve (Halloween) is meant to celebrate the Christian saints in Heaven, and that you can’t get more gruesome (or cool) than the Christian martyrs.

Teach the heathen kids that Christianity is the real counter-culture against the modern world.

Gaza Christians an intrinsic part of Palestinian society

“If the international community does not stop Israel’s aggression against the Palestinians,” the technical director of Al-Watania [Media Agency] told me, “you will not see any Christians in Gaza within a decade.”

There are two Christian communities in Gaza – Catholic and Orthodox — but there are no precise statistics for them. Neither of the two Churches in Gaza keeps such records, but according to Tarazi there were more than 30,000 Christians in Gaza in 1948. By 1987, though, when the First Intifada started, the number was only 18,000 and it has continued to decline because of Israeli aggression against the Palestinians. By 2006 there were just 2,500 Palestinian Christians in the enclave. “Today,” said Tarazi, “there are only 800.”

According to the director of public relations at Saint Porphyrius Church in Gaza’s Old City, it is indeed the Israeli aggression which is the main reason for the declining Christian population in the besieged territory. “We are part of the Palestinian people and we are affected by everything that affects everyone else,” Kamel Ayyad pointed out. “We experience all forms suffering under the Israeli occupation like our fellow citizens. Christians who left Gaza and those who are thinking of leaving are escaping from the occupation, siege and military offensives. They are looking for stability and freedom of movement.”

Read more at Middle East Monitor

Christians in the Turkish-Kurd firing-line

 

Tens of thousands of Christians are at risk of being caught up in Turkey’s invasion of the north-eastern Syrian borderlands, much of which is currently under the control of Kurdish terrorists. One of the first attacks of the Turkish campaign has been on the city of Qamishli, which was originally founded as a refuge for Christians fleeing the Turkish genocide conducted against Christians just over one-hundred years ago.

The first reported civilian victims of the Turkish bombing of Kurdish-held areas of Qamishli were a Christian family whose house was hit by either mortar fire or artillery shelling.

The Christians of northern Syria are trapped in a deadly vice between the Turkish army and its Jihadist militia forces and the Trotskyist-inclined Kurds who continue to persecute the Christian communities whenever and wherever they can.

About one-third of Qamishli is still under the control of the Syrian government and is protected by the Syrian Arab Army and government-supporting militias such as the Christian-based ‘Sootoro’. Undoubtedly it’s the only relatively safe area in north-eastern Syria for Christians to take refuge if they can manage to get past the Kurdish checkpoints.

The genocide of Christians is “a votive offering of the West” for oil

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The secretary of Foreign Affairs for the Philippines has told a panel discussion attached to the 74th Session of United Nations General Assembly that the persecution and killing of Christians throughout the world is a “votive offering of the West” to ensure oil supplies.

Participants of the panel related that “80% of people killed because of their religious beliefs are Christian and the number of Christians hurt or displaced is on the rise.

Hungary’s Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Peter Szijjarto, stressed that “In global politics, the fact that Christians are being persecuted is being ignored,” and that the Hungarian government is “fighting against the perception that Christianophobia would be the last acceptable form of discrimination.”

Since 2017, Hungary has provided $40 million to help persecuted Christians in the Middle East. Szijjarto said direct aid has been given to Catholic bishops eager to help Christians stay in their homes and encourage others to return from exile elsewhere.

“The bishops ask us not to invite people to settle in Europe because that contributes to fulfilling the goal of terrorist organisations to eliminate the Christian community,” he said.

Hungarian funds have been used to rebuild 1,000 homes on the Ninevah Plain in Iraq and reconstruct 33 Christian churches in Lebanon, he added. Four schools are being built in Iraq and Syria, and Hungary is covering the medical expenses of the three largest Christian hospitals in Syria.

Szijjarto said more than 50,000 Christians have either returned home or been able to stay in Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Ethiopia because of the Hungarian aid.

Ambassador Ghady El Khoury of Lebanon revealed that Christians now comprise just 5% of the population of the Middle East, down from almost 20% in the last century.